Questions to refrain from asking

Questions you should NEVER NEVER NEVER ask an Interviewer

Questions like:
  1. Never ask questions that might give the impression that you haven’t adequately researched the organization before the interview
  2. Don’t ask questions that might make the interviewer doubt your commitment to the job
  3. Never ask questions about salary or benefits
  4. Never ask interviewer, I read that you used to work for XYZ Company. Why did you leave?
  5. Any question that you could easily find out from doing a little online research
Now let's try to find out Why you shouldn't ask such questions in an interview.

Ques1: Don’t ask questions that might give the impression that you haven’t adequately researched the organization before the interview.

Employers despair at candidates who ask for more information about the company or what challenges it faces over the next few months and years because these are precisely the questions that you should have researched before the interview.

Ques2: Don’t ask questions that might make the interviewer doubt your commitment to the job.

Of-course you’re interested in how much holiday you’ll get, and whether you can work from home some days or what time most people generally pack up and leave the office for the day. But asking a hiring manager these questions in an interview will definetely raise a alarm bell in the mind of Interviewer as to whether you’re really going to put in the effort?

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Ques3: Don’t ask questions about salary or benefits.

Why? Because it’s pretty common for candidates to blankly scrabble around for a question when the opportunity arises at the end of the interview only to blurt out saying: “how much will I be paid?” If it hasn’t been discussed directly during the interview, it will be discussed after the interview if an offer is extended, so hold ON to these types of questions at the interview itself.
You can ask about all benefits later, when you’re close to an actual offer.

Ques4: I read that you used to work for XYZ Company. Why did you leave?

Stay away from personal questions like these. If you find you both have an interest in tennis, for example, mention it casually during the interview, not as a direct question that puts the interviewer on the spot.

Ques5: Any question that you could easily find out from doing a little online research.

This is pretty self-explanatory. Don’t waste their time with filler questions like this. If you really can think of nothing good to ask, then just say “No. Not at this time.”

A note of caution:

If your question makes them (the interviewer) uncomfortable even for a second, you may have undone all your hard work. It also raises questions about what you’d like to work with – and whether you really take the needs of others into account? Or it simply leaves a question about your judgment when working for them.

So by all means be creative and come up with original questions. But remember you’re not trying a game of out-clevering the interviewer – you’re trying to win a job!

If any ideas for questions come up during the interview itself, make a note of them, (it's a good practice to carry a pen and paper with you) and ask them at the end. In fact, questions that arise from the interview itself are often the best. They show you were actively listening, and are interested, and will be able to follow up on such things, as you might in an actual job.